Post-Bingo NHS

I took a look at my blog the other day. ‘Last post Jan 18 2016’, so nearly a year spent noodling around on Twitter rather than actually writing anything. I’d started a new job and that needed a fair bit of my attention, then there were games to play and food to eat and things to build. Then before you know it you’ve stopped writing and replaced it with reusing other people’s writing by ‘retweeting’ it.

Urgh.

No one reads blogs anymore, or so goes the common consensus, but when I use twitter I’m often redirected to a website, a blog or a whatever you call a Tumblr thing.

I also wasn’t angry. Well, that’s a bit of a lie. I first started writing because I was angry about things and writing about it got it off my chest. I’m still angry but I came to realise that not many people cared about the things I cared about, and so my writing didn’t exactly save the NHS, fix the planet or stop tech people from doing really dumb things.

But, maybe I do have it in me to write again. There are more and more stupid things happening, and while you may mutter about ‘echo chambers’ and ‘shouting into the void’, perhaps there might be a bit of value in starting to write again.

(If you are curious about the title, ‘bingo fuel’ is a term for the amount of fuel you need to land a plane safely. I’ve got a horrible fear that the NHS is past that point and is truely doomed. I hope for everyone’s sake that I’m wrong)

5 thoughts on “Post-Bingo NHS”

  1. The NHS is no longer fit for purpose. It almost certainly needs to be completely rebuilt from grass roots level up to make it both sustainable and appropriate for our medical/nursing/social care needs.
    How on earth we can get that done, I have no idea 🙁

  2. I agree, its been demolished from (not that long ago) having the highest approval rating ever to the depths we find ourselves in now. It’s pretty obvious why this has happened, and as more bits get sold off, leaving only the high-risk bits within the NHS, it will only get worse.
    It needs nationalisation, a massive cash injection, a commitment to staff training and frankly someone other than Jeremy Hunt running the thing.

    1. Hear hear.
      Your blog kept me (moderately) sane while I worked in the NHS, despite radically different local circs it was the same weird world.
      It breaks my heart that the NHS is being destroyed and there doesn’t seem to be a damn thing to be done about it.
      I lived in a developed country without a similar free health service and most people here simply have no idea what that is like.
      Please keep speaking up, perhaps more listen to you than you realise, we’ve missed your voice!

  3. Venting your anger can be cathartic if you are the sort to say “glad I was able to get that out of my system” and continue on with other things. What do you have to do to get into the dreaded management? That is how you can try to implement change. (notice I said try cause it can also feel like throwing yourself into a break wall everyday too.)

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