Booze

Rather busy at the moment (more on which later), so I've just got time to throw you a link to a section of the new London Ambulance website (which I happen to think is quite a good site, much better than the old one).

It's about drinking too much, and the accompanying video sums up some of my night shifts pretty accurately.

20 thoughts on “Booze”

  1. Nothing to worry about though! – //Health Secretary Alan Johnson told the BBC that thanks to better planning, winter was no longer a time of crisis for the NHS.”It's pressure we can cope with,” he said.//http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7789236.stm

  2. Question is… is this down to the licensing law change, cheaper drink, or have we managed to breed a generation of people who are so hopeless that they can only 'escape' by drinking themselves senseless? What a waste…

  3. I hate having to call you guys out for barely conscious drunksand would rather take them to a cell for the night if we were allowed. The last couple of months have been mental on both sides of our respective fence and the crew who turned up for a job I had the other night had clearly had enough of drunks, until I told them that this particular vomiting pleb was a medical student! They were chuckling like children as they made good use of the 'P' in AVPU, then took him to the A&E he was training at so they would rip him to shreds in the morning. There are brighter sides, but for the most part I would rather people just went home instead of making victims out of themselves!!

  4. Different part of the world, but the same time of the year and the same behavior. Except for the difference in uniforms that video could have been my last weekend shift. Sad isn't it.

  5. At the same time a 90 year-old woman is laying at the bottom of her stairs having to wait for an ambulance that is already out ferrying some drink sodden loser to casualty. And next day, this drink sodden loser will boasting to his mates about the fantastic night he can't remember.'Raising awareness' and 'highlighting' the problem is pointless. those who need to understand the message ignore it.

  6. Hillarious.. I bet he'll think twice next time.. or maybe just go and get drunk in another county, .. now that I think about it.. that's more likely, isn't it.I'd say it doesn't matter how clever/educated/wealthy people are, alcohol is a serious drug and it can get EVERYONE.

    To beat the problem in this country you'd have to brainwash every person and turn back the clock, it's not a simple, individual “issue”, it's a NATIONAL problem and down to society and I can say that as I'm not British and I've travelled a lot.

    That “booze bus” is a good idea but additional to it people should be properly “punished” for being that stupid .. Like that medical student, for everyone.

    Maybe somewhen and somewhere they will learn …

    To see my tax money go like that makes me cry btw!

  7. Sorry guys, but can somebody please highlight the fact that the video is showing the work of the “booze bus”, not a conventional emergency ambulance.Go that link to learn about that project which was introduced about 4 years ago to free up other ambulances (which can now go to not-alcohol-related incidents – although that doesn't mean that they don't get too many drunks as well):

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7147646.stm

  8. I never drink so much that I am not in control of the situation – not remembering things due to excessive alcohol consumption is always something I've found terrifying and I have never been able to understand why people boast of it so the video may be preaching to the converted. However, I was in two minds about my work xmas party – do I take the car and stick to soft drinks or do I use public transport, have a couple of beers and then get the night bus home and the video has just made me decide to go with the soft drink route!

  9. All the same it's a said reflection on society we need a booze bus. From the video most of these characters appear to be under 21, so what will happen when they're 50? If they get that far. And how will their offspring be?If only we could see a hundred years into the future.

  10. Wow, that's really quite shocking! How can people get like that? I've lived in college towns, and never seen anyone so out of control! But then again, I live in Oregon, and people are pretty mellow here and like to keep their partying at home, not on the streets. I had one of my son's friends spend the night at my house once because he'd drunk too much to get home safely, and he really appreciated it, but I don't think he makes a habait of drinking himself stupid.

  11. “You're not really drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on” – some people seem to aim for that point – but forget to stop one drink earlier.

  12. We see a lot of them in our students' union. I'm often on duty with St John Ambulance helping scrape them off the floor. I like to think we've saved the NHS quite a few callouts by looking after them until they're sober enough to get home safely, but unfortunately we still have to call out the ambulance and/or police for more than we'd really like.The sad thing is when you see the same people in the same state week after week.

  13. I really feel ashamed if I see people in that state but many of them don't – not for themselves or anyone – they think it's cool and you hear school children joke about it on the school bus in the morning day after day…It's all just a game and they have no idea what strain they put on other people and authorities.. …

    If only we could send them a bill or pillory them.. with a sign around their neck including a picture of their misery… then others (e.g. those who see their tax money go down the drain by that) could stone them properly.

    It only makes me angry to see those pictures.

  14. Good but not harsh enough in my opinion. One thing that never seems to be put across to people is that you have to drink more to achieve same level of drunkenness at each session so someone who hardly ever drinks gets drunk quicker. They are not a 'lightweight'. Another thing the “youth of today' -ha what a patronising sounding phrase- don't seem to get embarassed about what they did or didn't do when they were drunk, they seem to think it's all funny. Where do they get the money and don't they get hangovers? You see I've often thought that videoing someone when drunk and then playing it back to them when sober might help to get them to acknowledge that they have a problem but maybe not?It's all very sad and very worrying. All the fuss about smoking but very little about drinking. Passive smoking is far less harmful than the affects of alcohol on the non drinker- road accidents, violence, bankruptcy etc.

  15. If being sufficiently drunk that you have to be carted off in an ambulance is enough to get you charged with D&I (and it should be), then I would have thought that four weekends of cleaning up puke and washing out ambulances after drunken idiots have been scraped off the streets would be a fitting community service tariff.It might work, you never know…

  16. That's “drunk and incapable” you're talking about …”Drunk and disorderly” involves the person swearing, being abusive or causing trouble otherwise and as long as they can do that they're probably not drunk enough to need a trip to hospital (I doubt many of them do anyway) but the boys in blue have got a sort of fear that the “drunken sailor” drops dead in their cell so they are quite happy to let the ambulance service take them away …

    Understandable but it doesn't help, does it … …

  17. There will always be those that escape from the world thru the mist of stupor, see Hogarth series of gin induced pleasure?it affects all classes from the penniless to the rich and famous and talented, why, for a few moments of bliss they pay with days of pain and many times they pay with a rotting liver, but why worry, that be tomorrow, and tomorrow be always tomorrow.A few will learn either from the morning after effects or from seeing themselves in pics making a idiots of themselves or having to find the missing under clothes or bootie before going home to face the fire works.I like the new name for wagon that collects the “out of it” bodiesBack in days of pony and trap, the local Inn keeper would pour his inebriated regular into the trap, move the reins to the move position and then the pony would take home the sleeping penniless blissful owner to his barn, all seven miles, hill and dale across railway crossings that be opened at the behest of the signalman whom knew the situation of the local person of interest. The Local Bobby would wave him on, he did not have a pen for local imbibers.

  18. If someone is at the point where they are too drunk to look after themselves than that would constitute drunk and incapable, but its a seriously fine line between taking someone to a Police cell for their own protection so they can sleep it off instead of waking up in an alley half naked, and. We still do occasionally take people to the nick so they can sleep it off, some accept it and are fine, others kick off.The problem we have is a cell is not the right place for someone on the borders of consciousness as we have virtually no medical facilities immediately to hand, we also have to provide a Police officer to look after them on a 'constant watch' to prevent them choking to death – not something you guys want us to do when we only have a dozen or so Police officers to cover an entire city or london borough. Even if they are not quite that bad they have to be checked every 15 mins, again taking up resources meaning we can't take as many prisoners into custody, meaning people who should/could get nicked get left to wonder off. We are personally responsible for every single prisoner in custody and if someone dies than that's a good half dozen Sgt's and PC's suspended for months (if not years) and investigated for gross negligent manslaughter. F*ck that.

    I personally think that there should be a MASSIVE fine for people taken to hospital because of self induced intoxication. An Police issued 80 fine for drunk and incapable is nothing, especially as most don't get paid anyway, but a 2k fine for wasting an ambulance and A&E's time would give most people considerable pause for thought, especially if it was taken straight from their payslip in the form of a national insurance fine. “oh but I can't pay my mortgage payment or feed my family this month” tough, you shouldn't have got so pissed you couldn't look after yourself then.

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