Why I Love The Police – Reason #2175

There we were, driving towards station at 3am in the morning. We'd been having a nice shift so far – nothing too serious, no heavy lifting and no-one had tried to punch me.

We were just passing a local nightclub (well known locally for being a bit… 'dodgy') when a man jumped out in front of us to catch our attention. Here is a suggestion – don't be jumping out in front of a moving ambulance during a night shift. Sometimes we are sometime quite tired while driving…

I hopped out of the ambulance and looked at the patient the man was pointing at. He looked drunk, he also had a cut above his eye. He was lying on the floor and as I approached he tried to get up.

Staggering with his friends holding him up I tried to get a look at his wound. The patient wasn't interested in talking to me though, he just wanted to walk off.

Then I heard shouting from up the street and I saw why.

About 200 yards up the road two groups of men were fighting, proper fighting. I saw one man take a hell of a punch to the jaw knocking him to the ground. Two others then decided to kick him while he was down.

There was nothing that I could do – I'm not daft enough to wade into a group of fifteen people fighting, for someone who I don't know. Also I may have mentioned that a fair few people carry knives in this part of town. It's a part of town where there are no banks, they all closed down because they kept getting robbed on a regular basis.

So I called up for urgent police assistance – I had no idea what the mob would do once they finished hitting the bloke on the floor, would they suddenly take a dislike to men in green?

I love the police.

I really mean it – I think that they are superb.

I don't think they get paid much more than me, they get lied to by the government, they are everybody's scapegoat and they get called in when everything goes horribly wrong.

So two officers jumping out of a response car against a mob of fifteen people, any of whom might be armed with knives or guns, takes a courage that I don't think I have.

The crowd dispersed as more police arrived – the man who'd been kicked on the floor ran like a gazelle, two police in chase. They managed to catch him and slap some handcuffs on him.

I mentioned the other victim, the man who we'd been flagged down for, he'd also disappeared as soon as the police arrived. So, with a copper in the back of the ambulance we went to find him.

We met up with him further down the road. He'd made a lovely recovery and refused to be seen by us. He also refused to talk to the police. His friend, who was the man that had been chased and handcuffed also refused to talk to the police.

The CCTV footage was so poor that it was worthless as evidence, so the man was 'de-arrested' and they went on their merry way home.

I spoke to the Inspector who come out with the troops – they told me that they'd been alerted to the fight by the CCTV operator, but then our call for assistance had come over their radio so they'd put their foot down a bit more.

I love the police.

(Even when they use us to get rid of drunks).

Luckily, neither of the patients who refused treatment went on to die.

8 thoughts on “Why I Love The Police – Reason #2175”

  1. I've been reading your blog since I bought your book (finished it in about 12 hours – just couldn't put it down!)Always had admiration for the ambulance service (well except one Paramedic who deserted me when I really needed help, but I wont let the reflect on the rest of you!)

    Keep up the good work!

  2. I have a friend who is a police wom… officer. Some of her stories boggle my mind.That said, do I hear a hint of sarcasm in your closing sentence? (I bloody hope so!!)

  3. I've long believed we should set up dedicated spaces – probably in sports arenas – for people who are so inclined to be able to fight, weapons free, with some booze on tap and basic healthcare provided and where no laws apply (including, obviously GBH/ABH/murder etc, but also compensation, public liability etc).Some people out there live to be the hard man (or occasionally woman) of their area, and this would give them the chance to do it, and even if the healthcare was publicly funded it might help keep the clubs & bars free of the troublemakers who go out LOOKING for a fight.

    This culture is in as much denial about the violence of our species as the Victorians were about our sexuality, and just like the Victorian child prostitutes, it's the innocent who suffer when society represses perfectly natural, pro-survival drives.

  4. I love them as well. My bro in law is one. He's a Lt and about to promote to Captain and get back out on the streets. He has that 'courage' you speak of that I also do not have. To him, everyone is a bad guy. His favorite thing to do is put stupid people in jail. Unfortunately, the jails are full of them and so are the streets. Like you, I see them on an almost daily basis.At family gatherings the stories are quite good around the table with me, an EMT, hubby, a firefighter, and bro in law the copper. I love using your terms, “plod” and “water fairies” around them, cuz it gets right up their noses. Most of the time we tell the stories just for the shock factor..forcing my sister and mother up from the table. It's almost like a contest at who can get them up first.

    Our police department is creating an 'advance team' where the officers are all EMT certified. After listening to mine and my husband's stories, it's motivated him to put in for this new team.

  5. “Luckily, neither of the patients who refused treatment went on to die.”Yes but unfortunately they all survive to further pollute the gene pool…

  6. [quote]by smoochie597I've long believed we should set up dedicated spaces – probably in sports arenas – for people who are so inclined to be able to fight, weapons free, with some booze on tap and basic healthcare provided and where no laws apply (including, obviously GBH/ABH/murder etc, but also compensation, public liability etc). [/quote]

    We have something similar here in Italy. Hooligan sat every football match.

    Andrea

  7. As a serving police officer I can assure you the feeling is mutual. I'm not sure if I got 'special' treatment when I was injured on duty by an armed suspect but the treatment I received was first class. I've also had a paramedic jump out and assist me when I entered an impromptu wrestling match outside a local nightclub.

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