Night Number One

First off, my sympathies for everyone concerned in the murder of the West Yorkshire policewoman. I heard about it when I was sitting in the FRU listening to the news on the radio. We work with the police a lot, and most of them are really good people. I couldn't do their job, as at least most of the time people are happy to see us.
Bit of a busy night, partly I think due to the frost on the roads. I know that I wasn't able to drive too fast, as I was occasionally fishtailing across the road.The first job, aptly enough, was a man who had driven his car into a bus. The car was an utter mess, and I would have wanted to immobilise him in the car and have the fire service cut him out. I say would have wanted because once the crash was over, he'd run off…

So I'm guessing that the car was either stolen, or more likely he just didn't have any insurance, road tax, or a driving license.

A couple of 'nothing' jobs, then another car accident. Some bright spark had decided to borrow his friend's car, and then lose control of it on our main 'A' road. The car, yet again was a write-off, and the driver kept telling me that he was going to 'get done', because he didn't have any insurance… or a driving license.

Can you see a pattern?

I then had to go to a 13 year old child with a progressive and ultimately fatal disease. He was having difficulty in breathing due to a chest infection, and when I got there his breathing was incredibly irregular, and his oxygen levels were only 67% of what they should be. Even with high flow oxygen his oxygen levels were only just adequate.

There was a bit of worry about what I was going to do if he stopped breathing, as he had a 'Do not resuscitate' order, but it was a year out of date.

Thankfully it never came to it, and I was very happy when the crew arrived to take the child to hospital.

My final job was a bit of a nasty one. A young man (a cleaner) was found not breathing in a local supermarket. The call woke me from a light sleep, and as I mentioned, I couldn't drive too quickly to the call. I got there as the ambulance crew arrived, and we were led through the warrens of the supermarket by the cleaning supervisor.

The patient was large, covered in blood and vomit, and wasn't breathing. We attached our heart monitor, and it showed no activity in the heart at all.In the process of doing CPR, everything got covered in bloody vomit. As I type this, my jacket is in a plastic bag, waiting to be taken home and washed.

We got him to hospital, but they were unable to save him.

Once more it was a patient where no-one seemed to know him (no-one there knew his name, although they had been working with him for a couple of days), and I don't think he had any identification on him.

A tricky job for the police.

A busy night, but as my mum would say, “At least it made the time go fast”.

21 thoughts on “Night Number One”

  1. Not that I wanted to read an article of a police woman being killed, but it was nice to get the BBC link. I never thought of that to keep up on the news in England, it was a truly DUH! moment.I really enjoyed the link.

    I always hate when people are so alone in this world.

    Sassy

  2. P. S.I really enjoyed your Joan articles. I personally think you should do more of these writings.

    I would like to read one on seizures as I said before.

    I would also like to read one on Chronic Illness.

    Sassy

  3. 1: Joan was interesting and I enjoyed reading them. Prosit2: Would you have resuscitated the 13 year old boy if needed?

    3:Whilst reading the BBC article I got to remember some instances in which nurses/ambulance crew even got assaulted. I tend NOT2TOLLERATE this behavior!!

  4. Ignorant Office Worker Question: Do you really have to take your uniform home and wash it yourself after it's got covered in blood? Doesn't the hospital take it off you and boil the bejeezus out of it?

  5. My mum is a nurse and as far as I know, they have to wash their own uniforms. I remember as a kid my mum telling me not to touch her uniform or a coat (which she specifically used for work) under ANY circumstances. I still fear her uniform. It also doesn't help that I have OCD with contamination issues, lol!!!

  6. Were the two car accidents in the same area? Someone told me that they had seen the bus/car crash (near Tescos?) and another car pile up. I think a lot of the people in the area must have bought their driving licences 🙁

  7. It is amazing the number of people out there on the road who don't have a license or drive without road tax or insurance! The winter months tend to see alot of accidents, especially early in the mornings with the Sun low in the sky and the road icy and wet.Sad you work with someone and know nothing about them!

    The driving instructor

  8. Not so in the hospital i work in (Rotterdam, The Netherlands). We are not allowed to take our uniforms home, because of contamination issues. The uniforms are washed in the hospital.

  9. So medical staff around the country have to protect themselves from whatever nasties might splash on to their uniforms with a scoop of Daz and a warm wash cycle?Chef's in restaurants usually get laundered uniforms provided – even the pizza counter of the supermarket I used to work for.

    My dear old Grandma (God rest her colostomy bag) used to benefit from the hospital laundry service at home. They would deliver fresh sheets and towels weekly and take away the ones that had seen action. I was particularly grateful for this service as I later inherited her washing machine.

    IOW.

  10. So medical staff around the country have to protect themselves from whatever nasties might splash on to their uniforms with a scoop of Daz and a warm wash cycle?Chef's in restaurants usually get laundered uniforms provided – even the pizza counter of the supermarket I used to work for.

    My dear old Grandma (God rest her colostomy bag) used to benefit from the hospital laundry service at home. They would deliver fresh sheets and towels weekly and take away the ones that had seen action. I was particularly grateful for this service as I later inherited her washing machine.

    IOW.

  11. Well I replied to you query about how to spot a fake fitter in the original comment. As for doing more…I'm not to sure, maybe when I have dried up my 'ideas folder' I might do another one.

  12. Yep, we wash our own uniforms, trusting that anything nasty gets washed away…I'm not to bothered, because it's only *me* in contact with stuff, but if I had a family, then I might be a little more cautious.

    Anyway, all the really nasty infectious stuff dies after a bit of a wash.

  13. The Car/Bus crash was just outside Stratford bus garage, while the other one was on the A13. It's a testament to the design of modern cars that the drivers managed to walk(run) away from each crash.And yes, we have a *huge* number of uninsured/unlicensed drivers in the area…

  14. We used to have to wash our own scrubs, then the hospital gave us the option to eother let them or continue to do it ourselves. I never minded washing them, because if I had been involved in anything seriously nasty, I changed into new scrubs at work.One thing reading your blog has made me do is to make sure I have ID on me, somewhere. This was also a problem after Katrina. A lot of the people here did not have ID with them, especially the children.

  15. Hospitals used to wash uniforms in-house, but I suspect that lack of funding put a stop to that. I see nurses wandering around the supermarket in their uniforms.It doesn't help that modern fabrics can only be washed at 40 degrees too, so I'm sure that some of the bugs are just laughing at it.

  16. We have recently been issued washing machines and tumble driers on our station, in the hope that we will wash our kit at work which i do, but many members of staff still choose to go home to their kids etc wearing the manky things! They even provide the wash powder!Kirsty

  17. Bet some if not all the managers get car milage allowance for meetings, etc. Do you get washing powder, water and machine allowances? If not, it's yet another disgrace.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *